Tag Archives: Flash Fiction

Upcoming Events

Nuala has been head-to-the-desk, busy editing her forthcoming novel about Nora Barnacle for her new editor in New York – more on that to come soon!

In the meantime, you might catch her at one of these upcoming events:

Strangers in a Strange Land event at Bray Literary Festival, with Mary Costello and Oisín Fagan, Sunday 29th Sep at 1pm, Town Hall, Bray. More here.

Trinity College Dublin Literary Society, 5pm, 10th October: Reading and interview at Trinity College Literary Society, Dublin: Nuala returns to her alma mater to talk to the students at Lit Soc. about her latest novel, Becoming Belle.

Scotland: In late October Nuala is teaching the short story at Moniack Mhor in Scotland with Welsh writer Cynan Jones. More here. FULLY BOOKED.

Group 8 annual exhibition: LEONARDO 500 opens on 15th October, 6pm, Church Gallery, Ballinasloe Library. Nuala has written a flash fiction in the voice of da Vinci’s iconic Mona Lisa for this annual exhibition.

Spain: In November Nuala travels to Spain as part of EFACIS to teach and read to students in universities at Burgos and Logroño.

Dingle Literary Festival: In late November, Nuala is teaching a flash fiction workshop at Dingle Literary Festival and conducting a public interview with Leeann Lane about Dorothy McArdle. More here.

FLASH FICTION FESTIVAL

Nuala is taking part in a number of events at the third annual Flash Fiction Festival in Bristol, England, this weekend. The festival begins on Friday the 28th June 2019.

Nuala will teach a workshop on Historical Flash Fiction; take part in a panel discussion on International Flash; and read at the BIFFY event.

The festival is always a lively one, packed with workshops, panels and readings. Check it out here.

2018 Short Fiction Prize

Nuala has won the 2018 Short Fiction Prize with a story about Nora Barnacle, wife and muse to James Joyce.

Judge Ríona Judge McCormack said the follow of Nuala’s winning story ‘Gooseen’:

“The winning entry, ‘Gooseen’, stood out for its freshness, its stunning use of language, and its warm, beating humanity. Joycean Dublin as a setting can be a risky endeavour, the path having been so well-travelled already, but this story rises easily above such comparisons to bring us something new and satisfyingly urgent. There is a finely-balanced weighting here between the raunchy, delicious beginnings of a love affair and the more poignant aspects of Nora’s inner life. Giving voice to someone known only through the letters and writings of another is an audacious undertaking, but one ‘Gooseen’ achieves with both a dancing lyricism and a deftly-executed sureness of touch”.