News

NORA @ CÚIRT

The Cúirt International Festival of Literature programme is now announced! I am appearing on Friday the 23rd of April at 5.30pm in conversation, about my novel Nora, with the fab Elaine Feeney.

The event is a pre-record, from Ashford Castle, and will be watchable on YouTube. Bookings open now here.

Bio-fiction event with Jillian Cantor

Please join the fantastic Jillian Cantor and me at our virtual event on the 26th March from Poisoned Pen bookstore, Arizona, to discuss her novel on Marie Curie and mine on Nora Barnacle.

1pm MST / 8pm GMT

Sign up here: Jillian and Nuala bio-fiction event

NORA REVIEW – TORONTO STAR

I love this review of NORA, from Janet Somerville in the Toronto Star. Big thanks to Janet, writer and literature teacher, who has written a book about the wonderful Martha Gellhorn.

LOST LETTERS OF FLANN O’BRIEN

Join us online for the launch of The Lost Letters of Flann O’Brien – discovered in a disused cupboard in a Dublin pub during lockdown, The Lost Letters of Flann O’Brien contains 107 never-before-seen letters written to the cult Irish writer by a collection of twentieth-century luminaries, including Joseph Goebbels, Walt Disney, Virginia Woolf, Marilyn Monroe, Bob Dylan and Rachel Carson. Perhaps.

Date: Thursday, February 25, 2021 Time: 7:00pm GMT

Sign up: https://ljmu.libcal.com/event/3682891

Vermont NORA event

My friend, writer and librarian Peter Money, will interview me about NORA on the 12th March (5pm Irish time, midday USA) in association with the Norwich Bookstore, Vermont. More here.

Send an email to virtual2 AT norwichbookstore.com to get the link to join the event, which will be sent as soon as it is available.

Historical Novels Review – NORA

The Historical Novels Review has reviewed NORA today and it’s a goody. It’s here, but I’ve also pasted the text in below. Big thanks to Trish Macenulty.

Nora: A Love Story of Nora and James Joyce

WRITTEN BY NUALA O’CONNOR
REVIEW BY TRISH MACENULTY

In light of Brenda Maddox’s brilliant and exhaustive biography of Nora Barnacle—wife and muse of the writer James Joyce—and the 2000 film, Nora, about the couple’s relationship, a novel of Nora’s life might seem redundant or unnecessary. It isn’t. In fact, Nora by Nuala O’Connor is marvelous. Of course, by delving into Nora’s life, O’Connor must also write about one of the great geniuses of the English language. This would be dangerous territory for a lesser writer, but O’Connor has the literary chops to get the job done. Her lyrical style and Irish colloquialisms capture the essence of their feelings for each other as well for their home country. In Nora’s voice, she tells us, “Jim says I am harp and shamrock, tribe and queen. I am high cross and crowned heart, held between two hands.”

The novel begins on Bloomsday (June 16) in 1904 with an early sexual encounter between the ever-lusty couple. From there we follow the peripatetic wanderings of the pair as they travel from Dublin to Trieste to Zurich to Paris and back to Zurich. Along the way they have children, live (and fight) with Joyce’s siblings, and make friends and enemies across the continent, surviving hand-to-mouth one day and high-on-the-hog the next. They endure wars, illnesses, and madness. None of it is easy. Joyce drinks too much. He flirts with other women. He falsely accuses Nora of betrayal. But throughout all their travails, a powerful bond persists, as does Joyce’s passion for his art. O’Connor shows us just how integral Nora was to Joyce’s writing and to his success, and one comes away from this book with the sense that without Nora Barnacle, there would be no James Joyce.

Midwest Book Review – NORA

A lovely review today for NORA from the Midwest Book Review in the USA:

‘An historical novel but one that pays scrupulous attention to biographically accurate detail, Nora: A Love Story of Nora and James Joyce by author Nuala O’Connor deftly blends elements of love, ambition, and extraordinary people with extraordinary talents with the kind of narrative storytelling style that creates great and enduringly memorable fiction.’